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The Pembrokeshire Coast Path

NATIONAL TRAIL – Amroth to St Dogmaels

This guidebook describes the Pembrokeshire Coast Path National Trail. The scenic long-distance walk from Amroth to St Dogmaels is 180 miles long and takes about 2 weeks to walk, with soaring rugged cliffs, tranquil inlets and broad sandy beaches. Includes planning schedules, accommodation guidance and a 1:25,000 OS map booklet.

Seasons

The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path can be walked throughout the year. Accommodation may be more scarce in the winter months, but avoid high summer as it will be even more difficult to find. Highlights include spring flowers and countless seabirds breeding on cliffs and islands. Summer days on beaches exploring rock pools can be idyllic, while autumn brings woodland colours and pupping seals. Winters are generally mild, but rain and coastal storms can be ferocious.

Centres

Amroth, Saundersfoot, Tenby, Pembroke, Milford Haven, Solva, St David's, Fishguard, Newport and St Dogmaels.

Difficulty

35,000 feet of ascent in 180 miles over 14 days is a challenge requiring reasonable fitness and thoughtful planning and preparation. However, nothing is overly demanding with common sense and basic navigation being the main skills required.

Must See

With few large towns and little industry, Pembrokeshire's coast is largely unspoiled, leaving much of it feeling wild and remote. The walk brings a succession of expansive strands, spectacular cliffs and secluded bays, with traces in the landscape telling the story of past settlement and industry.
ISBN
9781786312082
Availability
Published
Published
28 Feb 2024
Edition
Third
Pages
264
Size
17.20 x 11.60 x 1.50cm
Weight
410g
Overview

A guidebook to walking the Pembrokeshire Coast Path National Trail between Amroth near Tenby and St Dogmaels by Cardigan. Covering 290km (180 miles) and over 10,500m of ascent, this trail takes around 2 weeks to hike. 

The route is described from south to north in 14 stages between 15 and 27km (9-17 miles) in length. An abbreviated route description is also given for those walking the route north to south, as well as alternate routes to avoid high tide and military range closures.

  • Contains step-by-step description of the route alongside 1:100,000 OS maps 
  • Includes a separate map booklet containing OS 1:25,000 mapping and route line 
  • The book features a handy trek planner that highlights information about accommodation, facilities and public transport along the route
  • Sized to easily fit in a jacket pocket

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Dennis Kelsall Cicerone author KELSAL

By Dennis Kelsall

Dennis and Jan Kelsall have long held a passion for countryside and hill walking. Since their first Cicerone title was published in 1995, they have written, contributed and illustrated over 50 guides to some of Britain’s most popular walking areas and have become regular contributors to various outdoor magazines. Their enjoyment of the countryside extends far beyond a love of fresh air, open spaces and scenery. Over the years Dennis and Jan have developed a wider interest in the environment, its geology and wildlife, as well as an enthusiasm for delving into local history, which so often provides clues to interpreting the landscape.

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Jan Kelsall Cicerone author Kelsall J

By Jan Kelsall

Dennis and Jan Kelsall have long held a passion for countryside and hill walking. Since their first Cicerone title was published in 1995, they have written around 35 guides to some of Britain’s most popular walking areas and have become regular contributors to various outdoor magazines. Their enjoyment of the countryside extends far beyond a love of fresh air, open spaces and scenery. Over the years Dennis and Jan have developed a wider interest in the environment, its geology and wildlife, as well as an enthusiasm for delving into local history, which so often provides clues to interpreting the landscape.

View author profile