Up for a challenge? Then the Cape Wrath Trail could be just what you are looking for.

The Cape Wrath Trail is widely regarded as Britain's toughest long distance route, and with good reason. The 3-week, 200-mile epic backpacking route from Fort William to the most north-westerly point of the British mainland crosses real wilderness and rugged terrain.

River Dessarry Stage 3 Cape Wrath Trail
River Dessarry Stage 3

Cape Wrath is not really a trail at all, but more a jigsaw of routes. Along the way through some of Scotland's finest country including Morar, Knoydart, Torridon and Assynt you'll find no arrows on fence posts to help your navigation, so we caught up with Iain Harper, author of the Cicerone Cape Wrath Trail to find out more.

"Perhaps because of this unique flexibility and lack of formal status, the Cape Wrath Trail has become highly regarded by many backpackers. It's a tough test for anyone and you'll brave remote country, rugged terrain, rain, wind, midges, bog and tricky river crossings.

Most people take between two and three weeks to complete the trek, and whatever time of year you attempt the trail it will test he limits of your physical and mental endurance. But dark boggy moments are quickly forgotten amid a solitude and beauty rarely found in modern life.

The Cicerone guidebook draws together updates and attempts to improve on a variety of routes that have previously been suggested. It also offers a wide range of variations, recognising that there can be no definitive path suitable for all. Follow as much or as little of the route as you like. Take detours, plan alternatives, make the journey your own. The Cape Wrath Trail is one that will live with you for the rest of your life."

For more of Iain's insights, why not head on over to his website dedicated to the Cape Wrath Trail. Here's you'll find the Cape Wrath Forum, with news, updates, route alternatives and more.

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