Walking in the Chilterns

35 walks in the Chiltern hills - an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

By Steve Davison

Guidebook to 35 walks in the Chiltern Hills of southern England. These chalk hills and ancient woodlands stretch from Reading and the Thames valley through Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire to Luton. The selected walks, which range from 4 to 12 miles, showcase the best of this AONB and are as suitable for walkers of most abilities.

Seasons

Seasons

Spring and early summer are best for wild flowers; in autumn, the beech woods are clothed in golden-brown autumnal colours; a frosty winter's day gives impressive views
Centres

Centres

Aldbury, Amersham, Chesham, Dunstable, Goring, Great Hampden, Henley-on-Thames, High Wycombe, Ivinghoe, Nettlebed, Princes Risborough, Tring, Wallingford, Wendover, Whipsnade
Difficulty

Difficulty

Walks to suit most ages and abilities; no difficulties apart from some short steep uphill and downhill sections; can be muddy in winter
Must See

Must See

Panoramic views from the crest of the Chilterns including Ivinghoe Beacon, Coombe Hill, Whiteleaf Hill and Watlington Hill; peaceful beech woods; riverside scenes along the River Thames, Chess, Gade and Misbourne; picturesque villages with thatched cottages, historic churches and cosy pubs
ISBN
9781786310187
Availability
Published
Published
24 Sep 2018
Edition
Second
Pages
224
Size
17.2 x 11.6 x 1.3cm
Weight
250g
  • Overview

    This guidebook describes 35 varied day walks in the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in southern England, which stretches through Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire. The routes range from 4 to 12 miles and cover fairly low-level terrain, and although some have several, sometimes steep, climbs and descents, they should be suitable for most walkers.

    The walks take you on a journey through this classic Chiltern landscape that has been shaped by human activity for thousands of years, visiting interesting historic sites, colourful gardens and picture-postcard villages with thatched cottages, fascinating churches and cosy pubs. Step-by-step route directions include lots of information about all these sites along the way, and are illustrated with clear OS mapping and vibrant photographs. There is also information on the region's rich geology, history and plantlife, as well as advice on accommodation, transport and refreshments.

    The Chiltern Hills follow a line of chalk from the River Thames at Goring up to the Barton Hills just west of Hitchin, boasting great views from the north west edge and, on the south east side, a more intimate undulating landscape of rounded hills and valleys, covered in a mix of broadleaved woodland and open farmland. Despite its relative proximity to the country's capital, the region abounds in peace and tranquility, making it an idyllic destination for a day's walk in the countryside.

  • Contents

    Contents
    Introduction
    Geology
    Plants and wildlife
    Brief history
    Where to stay
    Getting to and around the Chilterns
    Food and drink
    Walking in the Chilterns
    Maps
    Waymarking, access and rights of way
    Using this guide
    1 North of Luton
    Walk 1 Harlington and Sharpenhoe Clappers
    Walk 2 Barton-le-Clay, Hexton and Barton Hills
    Walk 3 Pirton and Pegsdon Hills
    2 Dunstable to Berkhamsted
    Walk 4 Whipsnade, Studham and the Dunstable Downs
    Walk 5 Ivinghoe Beacon, Ivinghoe and Pitstone
    Walk 6 Grand Union Canal, Pitstone Hill and Aldbury
    Walk 7 Grand Union Canal and Tring Park
    Walk 8 Great Gaddesden
    Walk 9 Berkhamsted, Nettleden and Little Gaddesden
    3 Wendover to Stokenchurch
    Walk 10 Cholesbury and Hawridge
    Walk 11 Wendover and The Lee
    Walk 12 Wendover, Ellesborough, Chequers and Coombe Hill
    Walk 13 Whiteleaf Hill and Great Kimble
    Walk 14 Bledlow and Radnage
    Walk 15 Lacey Green, Speen and Bryant’s Bottom
    Walk 16 Great Hampden
    Walk 17 Great Missenden and Chartridge
    4 Amersham to High Wycombe
    Walk 18 Chenies, Latimer and the River Chess
    Walk 19 Little Missenden, Penn Wood and Penn Street
    Walk 20 Hughenden, Bradenham and West Wycombe
    Walk 21 Penn and Coleshill
    5 Watlington and Nettlebed
    Walk 22 Christmas Common and Watlington Hill
    Walk 23 Turville, Skirmett and Fingest
    Walk 24 Pishill and Stonor
    Walk 25 Pishill, Cookley Green and Russell’s Water
    Walk 26 Ewelme and Swyncombe
    Walk 27 Checkendon and Stoke Row
    Walk 28 Hailey and Grim’s Ditch
    Walk 29 Nettlebed and Nuffield
    Walk 30 Greys Green, Rotherfield Greys and Greys Court
    6 Along the Thames
    Walk 31 Hambleden, Medmenham and the River Thames
    Walk 32 Henley-on-Thames and Middle Assendon
    Walk 33 South and North Stoke and Grim’s Ditch
    Walk 34 Goring-on-Thames and Cray’s Pond
    Walk 35 Whitchurch Hill and Mapledurham

    Appendix A Route summary table
    Appendix B Useful contacts

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Sdavison

Steve Davison

Steve Davison is a writer and photographer who has lived in Berkshire for over 25 years. He has written a number of books as well as articles for magazines and national and local newspapers, specialising in hill-walking and UK and European travel, and counts nature, geology and the countryside among his particular interests. A keen hill-walker for many years, and a Mountain Leader, Steve has also worked as a part-time outdoor education instructor. He is also a member of the Outdoor Writers and Photographers Guild.

View Articles and Books by Steve Davison