Walking Loch Lomond and the Trossachs

70 walks, including 21 Munro summits

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Availability
Not Yet Published
ISBN
9781852849634
Published
15 Feb 2018
Edition
Second
Pages
288
Size
17.2 x 11.6 x 1.6cm

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A guide to walking and scrambling routes in the beautiful Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Over 70 graded low-level, mid-level and mountain walks taking in hills, glens and picturesque woodland, as well as all of the region's Munro summits. Highlights include Ben Lui, Ben Lomond, the Cobbler and the Arrochar Alps.

Seasons Seasons
Year round. Spring and early summer are the very best time for high and low level routes. Mountain routes under snow require winter hillwalking experience, clothing and equipment.
Centres Centres
Aberfoyle, Callander, Lochearnhead, Killin, Tyndrum, Crianlarich, Loch Lomond side, Arrochar, Lochgoilhead. Daywalks can be reached by car from Glasgow, Stirling and Edinburgh.
Difficulty Difficulty
Routes (which are graded 1-5 for difficulty) for all abilities, from woodland and lochside routes, to long mountain days, some of which are on rocky ground. The summit of the Cobbler is an exposed scramble.
Must See Must See
Ben Lomond. Arrochar Alps and The Cobbler. Oakwoods of the Trossachs. Ben Lui. The Cowal peninsular, and the Fairy Knowe at Aberfoyle.
Availability
Not Yet Published
ISBN
9781852849634
Published
15 Feb 2018
Edition
Second
Pages
288
Size
17.2 x 11.6 x 1.6cm
  • Overview

    Guidebook to over 70 walking routes in the hills of Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park in Scotland's Southern Highlands. Including 21 Munros on less-popular routes, as well as plenty of Corbetts and Grahams. Hill summits of Ben Lomond, the Cobbler, Ben Lui and the Arrochar Alps have plenty of routes to explore. The routes in this guide range from 1 to 17 miles, and are clearly graded for distance and difficulty, as well as dividing between low-level, mid-level and mountain walks. From short, loch-side strolls suitable for all walkers, to long, challenging mountain routes with rocky scrambling, the Loch Lomond and Trossachs hills have plenty to offer. 

    The glens and mountains walks in this guide are divided into area: the Trossachs, Callander and Loch Lubnaig, Balquhidder and Lochearnhead, Crianlarich to Inveraran, Tyndrum, Ben Lomond, Loch Lomond West, Arrochar Alps and Glen Croe to Loch Goil.

    The hills and glens of the Trossachs and Loch Lomond are the first of the Highlands as you come from the south and first in the affections of many hill-goers. Slightly less savage than their northern counterparts, they have a rugged charm all of their own. Their ridges are wrinkly schist and grassy picnic places, their lower slopes are oakwoods and ferries cruise the lochs in between. This guidebook includes plenty of background information on the area, as well as practical information on getting to and around the region's walks, as well as advice on accommodation, what equipment to take, when to go, as well as interesting details on the schist rock that makes the hills, and important information on access in the hills and on Scottish estates.

  • Contents

    INTRODUCTION
    The High Road and the Low
    Walking conditions
    When to go
    Safety in the mountains
    Maps
    Compass and GPS
    What's in this book
    How to use this book
    THE EAST
    PART 1 Trossachs
    1 Ben Venue (shorter)
    2 Ben Venue (Achray horseshoe)
    3 Ben A'an to Loch Katrine
    4 Aberfoyle to Menteith Hills
    5 Aberfoyle Fairy Knowe
    Summit Summary: Ben Ledi
    6 Ben Ledi and Benvane from Brig o' Turk
    7 Finglas Woods
    PART 2 Callander and Loch Lubnaig
    8 Ledi from Lubnaig
    9 Ardnandave Hill to Ben Ledi
    10 The Whole Kilmahog: Lowland to Highland
    11 Callander: Falls and Crags
    12 Glen Ample
    13 Beinn Each from Loch Lubnaig
    14 Hill of the Fairies, Strathyre
    PART 3 Balquhidder and Lochearnhead
    15 Stob a' Choin
    16 Cruach Ardrain to Beinn a' Chroin
    17 Stob Binnein and Ben More from the south
    18 Glen Ogle Rail Trail
    19 Kendrum and Ogle Circle
    20 Twa Corbetts
    21 Ben Vorlich and Stuc a' Chroin
    THE NORTH
    PART 4 Crianlarich to Inverarnan
    22 Meall Glas and Sgiath Chuil
    23 An Caisteal Horseshoe
    24 Beinn Chabhair
    25 Beinglas Falls Circuit
    26 Beinglas Falls to Beinn a' Choin
    27 Meall an Fhudair
    PART 5 Tyndrum
    28 Glen Cononish
    29 Beinn Odhar
    30 Auchtertyre Farm Walks
    31 Ben Challum and Two Corbetts
    Summit summary: Ben Lui
    32 From Glen Falloch by the Pipeline Track
    33 From Dalrigh by Dubhchraig and Oss
    33A From Dalrigh by Dubhchraig, Oss and Beinn a' Chleibh
    34 Coire Gaothach Southern Ridge
    34A Coire Gaothach Northern Ridge
    35 By Beinn Chuirn
    36 Coire an Lochain and Coire Gaothach (descent)
    37 Coire Laoigh (descent)
    38 Ben Oss, Beinn Dubhchraig to Dalrigh (descent)
    39 Descent to Dalmally
    THE WEST
    PART 6 Ben Lomond
    40 Ben Lomond: South Ridge and Ptarmigan
    41 Lomond Slopes
    42 The Back of Ben Lomond
    43 Conic Hill
    44 Duncryne
    45 Bonnie Banks by Boat
    46 The Bonny Banks (north)
    PART 7 Loch Lomond West
    47 Luss Hills South
    48 Luss Hills: Dubh and Doune
    49 Cruach Tairbeirt
    PART 8 Arrochar Alps
    50 Ben Vorlich from Ardlui
    51 Arrochar to Bens Vane and Ime
    52 Beinn Narnain by Spearhead Ridge
    53 Beinn Narnain by A' Chrois
    54 Coire Grogain
    55 Succoth and See
    Summit summary: the Cobbler
    56 North Ridge from Cobbler/Narnain Col
    57 East Corrie
    58 From Ardgartan by the Southeast Ridge
    58A Descent via Buttermilk Burn to Ardgartan
    59 From A83 by the Back Stream (Coire Croe)
    60 From A83 via Beinn Luibhean
    60A From A83 via Beinn Luibhean and Beinn Ime
    61 Central Peak (The Argyll Needle)
    62 South Peak (the Cobbler's Wife)
    63 Narnain Boulders
    64 North Ridge and Buttermilk Burn Descent
    65 Southeast Ridge Descent
    PART 9 Glen Croe to Loch Goil
    66 The Brack and Beinn Donich
    67 Argyll's Bowling Green
    68 Beinn an Lochain
    69 Beinn Bheula
    70 Glen Branter Tracks
    71 Creag Tharsuinn
    72 Loch Eck and Beinn Mhor
    73 Puck's Glen

    THE LONG ROUTES
    Appendix A Mysteries of the Schist
    Appendix B Access (especially during autumn)
    Appendix C Accommodation and information
    Appendix D Further reading

  • Maps
    MAPS

    Some people enjoy exploring in mountains that are poorly mapped or not mapped at all. They should stay away from the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, as it has been excellently mapped – four times over. The mapping in this book is from the Ordnance Survey's Landranger series at 1:50,000. For lower-level walks this book's mapping may well be all you need. For mountain walks, however, it's advisable to have a larger map that shows escape routes (and the other glen you end up in when you come down the wrong side of the hill).

    The 1:50,000 Landranger mapping covers the area on sheets 56 (Loch Lomond), 57 (Stirling & Trossachs), 50 (Glen Orchy) and 51 (Loch Tay). The Crianlarich Hills (Parts 3 and 4) are awkwardly on the shared corner of all four maps.

    For detailed exploration of crags and corries and pathless boulder slopes you will be helped by the extra contour detail at 1:25,000 scale. The Harvey maps are ideal; they are beautifully clear and legible, mark paths where they actually exist on the ground, and do not disintegrate when damp. They also overlap conveniently. Five Harvey sheets – Arrochar Alps, Crianlarich, Ben Lomond, Ben Ledi, Ben Venue – cover the national park apart from Cowal (Walks 70 to 73) and the Luss Hills (Walks 47 and 48).

    The Harvey maps mark fences and walls on the open hill, but not on the lower ground; so if you're planning complicated valley walks you may prefer the Explorer maps, also at 1:25,000 scale. They are bulkier and less robust than the Harvey ones, and the contour lines are less legible, but if Harvey hadn't done it better, they'd be excellent maps. Sheets 364 (Loch Lomond North) and 365 (Trossachs) cover most of the ground, with 347, 360 and 363 for outlying western and southern walks.

    Harvey also offers the British Mountain Map: Southern Highlands, covering the national park apart from Cowal at 1:40,000 scale; also the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park Outdoor Atlas at 1:40,000 scale. It's spiral bound to fit into a map pocket, and has useful overlap between the pages. Not everybody will like it, but I used it for researching and walking the routes in this book.

    The relevant maps (LR = Landranger; Expl = Explorer) are listed in the information box which appears at the start of each route.

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    In good winter conditions Ben Lui is the best. The south ridge (Route 33) with Ben Lomond and the Arrochar Alps behind.

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Ronald Turnbull

Ronald Turnbull writes regularly for TGO, Lakeland Walker, Trail and Cumbria magazines. His previous books include Across Scotland on Foot, Long Days in Lakeland and Welsh 3000ft Challenges. He has written many other Cicerone guides, including Walking in the Lowther Hills, The Book of the Bivvy and Not the West Highland Way.

View Articles and Books by Ronald Turnbull