Scrambles in the Dark Peak

Easy summer scrambles and winter climbs

By Terry Sleaford, Tom Corker

Guidebook to 41 graded scrambles in the Dark Peak and Roaches areas of the Peak District, most of which can be done year round. Includes areas such as Kinder Scout, the Wilderness Gullies and Bleaklow, and features both classic (Wilderness Gully East and Wildboar Clough) and lesser known routes. Link routes, variants and extensions also described.

Seasons

Seasons

Four winter-only routes; all others possible at any time of year, although heavy rain and higher than usual water levels will affect some scrambles
Centres

Centres

Most scrambles in this guidebook are within easy reach of Derby, Nottingham, Sheffield, Leeds and Manchester. Local centres could be Edale, Crowden, Hayfield, Greenfield.
Difficulty

Difficulty

Routes are graded 1 to 3 in order of increasing difficulty (from 'scrambly' walks to moderate/difficult rock climbs). Easy scrambles are suitable for adventurous walkers with good fitness and navigation skills, harder routes require some rock climbing experience. In winter conditions, Scottish winter grades 1-2/3 apply and crampons and ice axes will be needed.
Must See

Must See

Kinder Downfall and the ravine; Ashop Clough and its gullies; Bleaklow via Ashton Clough; Torside Gully; Wildboar Clough; the Wilderness Gullies - all are good scrambles at any time of year. Mam Tor and Back Tor gullies are local winter classics.
ISBN
9781786310163
Availability
Published
Published
22 Aug 2018
Edition
Second
Pages
192
Size
17.2 x 11.6 x 1.2cm
Weight
220g
  • Overview

    This guide describes 41 scrambles in the Dark Peak and Roaches areas of the Peak District, most of which can be done all year round. The selection of routes are graded 1 to 3, offering a range of scrambles to suit all abilities. Both classic and lesser known routes are featured, taking in areas such as Kinder Scout, the Wilderness Gullies, Bleaklow, Chew Valley and Crowden.

    Route description, together with information on approach, link routes, variants and extensions, is accompanied by extracts of 1:25,000 OS mapping. Also included is practical information regarding safety, equipment, access and conservation.

    The UK's first designated national park, the Peak District has long been famed for its walking and climbing opportunities. Perhaps lesser known are the routes that lies somewhere in between - the 'hand's on' ascents that offer the thrill of an adventurous line without venturing on to the climber's crags. This guide showcases some of the best routes in the Dark Peak, perfect for those looking for a change from the well-trodden paths that lead to the moorland tops.

  • Contents

    Contents
    INTRODUCTION
    Scrambling in the Dark Peak
    Warnings and precautions
    Equipment
    Maps
    About the routes
    Access
    Conservation
    THE CHEW VALLEY AREA
    1 Rimmon Pit Clough/Trinnacle/Holme Clough
    2 Alderman's Rocks
    3 Dovestone Quarry Central Gully
    4 Charnel Clough
    THE WILDERNESS GULLIES
    5 Wilderness Gully West
    6 Wilderness Gully East
    7 Wilderness Gully Far East
    8 Wilderness Gully Far Far East
    9 Wilderness Gully Far Far Far East
    10 Chew Brook
    THE CROWDEN AREA
    11 Oaken Clough
    12 Coombes Clough
    BLEAKLOW
    13 Shining Clough
    14 Deer Knowl
    15 Lawrence Edge No 1
    16 Lawrence Edge No 2
    17 Wildboar Clough
    18 Torside Clough
    19 Torside Gully
    20 Yellowslacks Brook/Dowstone Clough
    21 Ashton Clough
    22 Alport Castles Tower
    23 Alport Castles Gully
    KINDER SCOUT
    24 Blackden Brook
    25 Fair Brook
    26 Fair Brook Gully
    27 Nether Red Brook
    28 Upper Red Brook
    29 Far Upper Red Brook
    30 Square Chimney Exit
    31 Kinder Downfall Climb
    32 Arpeggio Gully
    33 Red Brook
    34 Crowden Clough
    35 Grindsbrook Clough
    36 Ringing Roger
    OUTLYING AREAS
    37 Back Tor Gully
    38 Mam Tor Gully
    39 Elbow Ridge
    40 Roaches Lower and Upper Tier Ridges
    41 Chrome Hill/Parkhouse Hill

    Appendix A Index of routes
    Appendix B Further reading
    Appendix C Useful contacts

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Sleaford

Terry Sleaford

Bred, born and still living in Nottingham, Terry was 23 years old before he climbed his first proper rock routes at Lawrencefield Quarry in the Peak District and his climbing career soon peaked at leading v.diffs! After a few years of being dragged up harder routes, he decided that the life of a 'crag rat' was not for him.
A weekend away in Snowdonia in the late 70's opened his eyes to other possibilities and he began to restrict his climbing activity to trips to Wales, the Lakes and the highlands and islands of Scotland, gradually extending his skills to include winter snow and ice climbing. As he got older, the combination of a walk into the mountains, followed by a few hundred feet of steady scrambling to reach the summit, became his idea of a good day out.

View Articles and Books by Terry Sleaford
Corker Tom

Tom Corker

Tom has been walking and climbing in the Peak District for 45 years as well as having extensive Alpine and British mountaineering experience in both summer and winter. He has developed a great affection for these Moorland places at all times of the year and in all weathers. Alone, or with friends, he has realised how varied and interesting are the opportunities for having great 'hands-on' fun using all the skills used in the bigger mountains.

View Articles and Books by Tom Corker